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? st. paul tells us you are the body of cryings. the people of god, the mystical body, the church is the body of christ. well, i've noticed it was odd that's hardly referred to the fact that he didn't believe that that was the case, and he said it frequently and emphatically. i talked to peter brown, the great expert, and he was told by catholics that oh, august teen -- augustine believed it, but he believed in the early code of the church, which existed, but never applied to what was given out at the agape meal. it applied to the creed, especially. when you were prepared for baptism, you learned the creed by heart. you were forbidden to write it down or to say it out loud anywhere where a nonbaptized person could hear it. that was the innermost secret of the faith, the creed. as i explored it more and more, there's a line of people in the middle ages kind of forgotten now for very good reason, they all had the view that's not really the literal body and blood, and i began to wonder why why do we never hear about the people? we didn't because they were condemned, but nonetheless,
are not against any entries. >> host: we've been talking with max paul friedman, "rethinking anti-americanism" a history of an exceptional concept in american foreign relations. here's the cover of the book published by cambridge university press. you're watching booktv on c-span 2. >> we have to take back the media. independent and you will save us. the most powerful institutions on earth. more powerful than any bomb. more power than any missile is an idea that explodes onto the scene. but it doesn't happen but it contained by that box, the tv screen that we allocate that are so many hours a week. we need to be able to hear people speaking for themselves outside the box. we can't afford the status quo and a more from global warring to global warming. >> other generations data we adapt, how to remove, how do we go forward in this fast-paced world? the millennial speak at all in stride because that's the reality of how we grew up and it's also private use and adapt ability. the ability to be resilient, the economic crisis which has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredibl
the tv on c-span 2. >> next, max paul friedman on his book "rethinking anti-americanism." >> host: professor max paul friedman, author of "rethinking anti-americanism," why do they hate us? >> guest: that's a good question. americans have been asking that the since 1899 as they discovered that looking at old copies of "the new york times." we asked it to 20th century and as it turns out first of all they don't hate us if we think about world opinions. the united states and fight since he said the event of scientific polling in the 1920s and 3
to the component was paul horowitz. his equal and intellectual in love of the good fight to the impromptu discussions often ended in shouting matches between the two. a hot topic in the lunchroom debate was cuba and the leader fidel castro who had come to power in 1959. most students saw castro as a romantic revolutionary bringing economic and social justice to his people. elite viewed him as another standard issue communist dictator. angela davis, mr. protagonist, was in the class of 1961. the class included robert deniro for a time. his parents were artists that lived in the village, and kathy that later became involved in the 1981 brinks robbery in which a guard and two policemen were killed and served many years in prison for that. angela grew up in birmingham alabama at the height of jim crow, and to escape from the wretched segregated school system, she entered on her junior year in a scholarship in the service committee and i will just read a short passage about her. when she entered the school although angela braced herself for outright hostility, she hadn't foreseen her posts ten
it to paul stevens. he was on the list photography be sent be sent to president ford of possibilities. but heavy quit combat the nation as a whole would've suffered. so he stayed in office, in the sg's office. he was so determined not to benefit that he turned down an opportunity to be appointed as attorney general. he turned down the chance to work from the attorney general smart aleck in office. he avoided the attorney general's private dining room and even turned down the attorney general chauffeur limousine or the time he was acting attorney general. i can't say much more about those times. they occupied the last six month of 1973 united not arrive until may 1974. but everything bob bork says in his book he set in 1974. richardson, ruckelshaus and the people who work with him most closely then such as admin kitchen keith jones tell the same story. and bork's narration is entirely consistent with the man i knew for 40 years. intellectual, considering consequences before acting and absolutely honest. he's also the funniest man i ever met. that didn't come through in his 1987 hearing
to you a little bit one of the things in the book, around expulsion and suspension and you have paul tuft's book, talking about noncognitive variables and their importance on achievement. can you talk about the role of a curriculum and either in terms of how limited it is here or what it should be in terms of addressing all the needs of a child of significant needs of children. >> sure. i do think the way that the landscape of schools has evolved here over time -- and not really because of anybody's bad intentions or deliberate oversight. there's sort of one model of school that is particularly prevalent, and that is a very highly structured environment, this very focused on core subjects and academic remediation and getting kids to the point where they can pass the state standardized tests and good on to college. i think there are a number of schools doing absolutely amazing work, a wonderful job with kids and a number of kids that thrive in those environments. but i feel like unless we have sort of a more diverse kind of ecosystem of different schools and approaches, it's going to be ha
and others so she was a pretty good domestic president. i talked to a guy named paul musgrave who said in the first three or four months of the presidency it was like a golden age if you go back and look at it again it's amazing. all the stuff is going on, new policies and ideas, and the public pieces, john osborn wrote for the watch and said the domestic policy meetings they sit around for hours laughing it and there on a whole different side of mixing. then it all stopped. he stopped. he lost interest. >> that is what makes him such a puzzle. >> i'm not suggesting that you are doing this but i was watching on c-span some clips from nixon's state of the union address. again, i am not suggesting this is a way of becoming healthy, but i did it. and i noticed him talking again and again about the environment. and how proud she was of his achievement in cleaning up the aerts and of the water. he said it and he was proud of it publicly, and yet on the tapes you have him grousing about it not once or twice, but constantly, identify and environmentalism with liberals saying that we have made
lunch with paul ryan. for the reasons we don't understand is ronald reagan would of done that, george bush would have done that and for the country to be successful we have to put aside some of this vitriol that exists and begin to recognize it just because the other side doesn't have our view it doesn't mean that they are not motivated for love of country. we have to get to a different place where we can find a broad consensus based on principles. that's how we will win. ronald reagan for me is someone that is a role model not because of his great success. she is certainly that but also a role model for the political system that we have today. imagine a country with the energy resources that we have with the immigrant heritage that we have that has been our blessing. with the ability to solve the problems that seem intractable today. this country will take off. this country will be the inspiration for the rest of the world. we will regain or footing and rebuild the greatest country on the face of the earth and requires the kind of leadership that ronald reagan showed each and every d
of paul. -- hall''. tonight will be much more civil than that but to give you a sense of continuity of the history here coming it is most fitting lee it will come the most honorable mary robinson the former un high commissioner to cooper union and president of ireland. her career is devoted to the pursuit of fairness in all aspects of society. as an activist lawyer she defended the causes of women that were marginalized as a member of the irish senate she promoted progressive legislation including the legalization of contraception for the president robinson has been the honorary president and is a member of the elders 11 independent group leaders brought together by mandela to offer collective experience to promote the -- peace building and to promote the shared interest of humanity. in 2009 obama awarded the presidential medal of freedom calling an advocate for the hungry and hunted and be forgotten and ignored. mary robinson it has not only showed a light on human suffering but those for a better future for the world. in her book "everybody matters" my life giving voice" really se
there was only one sentence on the subject in senator rubio's speech last week, the left's blogosphere from paul krugman on down exploded with rage. idiotic! thoroughly refuted, and the perennial favorite, it's a lie, was the way rubio's comment was characterized. my aei colleague, ed pinto -- who's right here in front of me -- and i were once accused by joe nocera in his new york times column of using the big lie tech meek for suggesting that the government -- technique for suggesting that the government had a major role in the financial crisis. it doesn't get much worse than being compared to joseph goebbels. [laughter] most americans have no idea that there is an alternative view of what caused the financial crisis. the result is an odd gap in public discourse on this issue. as an illustration, when i am interviewed about the financial crisis, i am often asked why no bankers have been sued personally or tried criminally for causing the crisis. i usually respond by saying i don't think that the bankers actually caused the crisis. this appears to interviewers -- to leave these interviewers dumb
, is a demographic and democratic fact. republican vice presidential candidate, paul ryan, you might remember, a couple weeks ago suggested president obama was re-elected on the back urban voters. that's right. the city is blue. not in the narrow sen of being democratic but open, multicull cur, creative, willing to cooperate. it's a good thing. most a bad thing. it's a fact not a political'd yolings. it describes nature of the -- the globe looks ever more like the city and ever less like the rural landscape. the world we live in is multiculture, is connected interdependent. cities which make them ideal representative for today. in embracing the urban has been they is our destiny. we can begin to suspend the cynicism and pessimism about politics. we are liberated to build a -- on the approachial foundation of the ancient city. guided by the blueprint implicit in the mega size modern successors. eurozone is likely to fall apart. the cities are coming together. the united states and china may be paralyzed by the competing sovereignty and the rival abstract ed what american and chinese cities can
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11